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Building the Next Berkshire Hathaway

Daniel Braem

Buy this book at Amazon.com or try Amazon.co.uk in England, Amazon.ca in Canada, Amazon.de in Germany, Amazon.fr in France, Amazon.it in Italy, Amazon.es in Spain. ASIN=1608606112, Category: Investment, Language: E, cover: HC, pages: 172, year: 2009.

Buchbeschreibung
It is becoming more and more difficult to find well-managed companies in today's business world. The recent financial blowups demonstrate the overriding lack of respect for shareholders. For their own benefit, management risks shareholder assets without restraint. If the risky bets pay off, bonuses are awarded. If the risky bets fail, it is no loss to management and they may just get a hefty severance package in the process. However, from back in the 1960s, one man, Warren Buffett, has dedicated himself completely to his shareholders. In managing Berkshire Hathaway, Buffett took a company worth $40 per share and built it into an empire worth close to $100,000 per share in today's market. In spite of this incredible success, very few of Buffett's actions are replicated in modern business practices. Building the Next Berkshire Hathaway outlines the business principles that helped establish this company as one of the best run in U.S. history. Whether you are an investor who wants to be able to recognize the potential for business success or an executive ready to establish policies that benefit your shareholders, this book is an indispensable resource. There are a number of books that will tell you how to invest like Warren Buffett—this book takes it a step further to show how his success as a CEO was tied to his treatment of shareholders.